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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 383 (some duplicates have been removed)
of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
is not the only thing on the president's plate. i looked at foreign-policy. helping our heroesork on this veterans day. we look at the most military friendly employers and what they're doing to help. stay with us. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer the mercedes-benz winter event is back, no matr which li you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 ml350 for $599 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. ♪ gerri: president ba's focus has been here at home, but what about abroad? we will another four years of president obama foreign policy policy look like? let's ask k.t. mcfarland. we have been focused like a laser thattax problems to hit the country but it is for a policy that is being ignored. >> when the economy is bad ople don't care about foreign policy is hard to get excited about the middle east with no job in the u.s. the big loser is israel. the president has already said he is stepping away. will the united states help them stop by iran? they will do with them as some point*. gerri: how do you do with a country like tat? >> it willdivide it to the p
conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party in search of voters. that's next. ♪ [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. i
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implicatns. wouljust argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a jugul
couple months the president will have to remake his foreign policy team. needs a new secretary of state, needs a new treasury secretary which has a big foreign policy component and a question of tom donna lin whether he might become white house chief of staff or stay in his job. if general petraeus does go that's another big piece. implications in congress. more votes in the senate makes confirmation for new people easier but the choices the president has, we don't know, i don't know anyone who knows for sure what his choices were preelection or instincts, but he has to fill big jobs and that has implications for him between business and congress, and a second term agenda. we've seen second term foreign policy is a big ticket item for a president. >> brian williams, when we talk about the new team and this will be, you know, the next as mark halperin just pointed out, the next big play, who will be the cabinet officials, some people urged him senator john kerry the foreign relations chair, would be the best equipped for secretary of state, deval patrick in massachusetts would appoint a
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
time from a foreign policy standpoint to have petraeus out. scandals that are taking key players out of afghanistan, syrian discussions. country that the president has a lot going on right now. >> we were joking coming in that you have to stare at your blackberry because every five minutes something new happens. the one familiar aspect of the david petraeus scandal is that he had an affair. everything else about this story is weird, in the washington post. >> i was going to see skyfall this weekend. i'm going to stay at home and read the sunday times. this is totally bizarre. there's so much that we don't know, this fbi investigator. not just four people. there's an fbi and cia, infa infatuated with jill kelley >> let's get this straight. this guy works at the fbi, becomes infatuated. she gets shirtless photos of him allegedly. she goes to him and says i'm getting these weird e-mails. >> he takes this matter into a federal investigation you have to wonder. an fbi investigation if not for this one agent's involvement and especially him going to congress as a whistle blower saying it w
around the hill. there is a domestic component to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. [ piano plays ] troy polamalu's going deeper. ♪ ♪ and so is
be a republican party that was fiscally conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party -- the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 you know, the one that's been lying around. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k)
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
the argument on foreign policy in part because a lot of people are sick of the two wars that george w. bush got us into. that's just a fact. gorgeous george w. bush's type of republic party mitt romney as todd akin richard mourdock in another. >> very good with latinos, kevin mccarthy. we have some bright new leaders and we need to have more of those. >> george w. bush's policies spending and two wars ended up also delivering barack obama into the white house. but let's start with you, chip. your take where we are. what do you think of my point that romney ran a defensive campaign but he also did have to deal with the bush baggage, credibility on spending, and a foreign policy that was frankly the by product of the hopeful but ultimately rather confused and unsuccessful policy in the middle east? >> yeah. i think you are spot on. first, let me say i aspire to be one of those old white guys. >> laura: and rich. >> definitely be a rich old white guy no question. that's what i aspire to be. no question a heavy load for romney. to thine ownself be true. we know who we are as a party. center right p
of the most powerful voices of criticism of president obama when it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into the party. >> he can become a cable tv host. one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today, he's gone, over, history. it sounded like a valedictory. he was sort of going to recede, did it twice. tried, lost and there were a lot of people who recorded him as a transitional figure even when he was nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bayne capital, who knows? i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him broaden out? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a house member to get and that is nationwide recognition. he is also a bonafide brainiac with budget things. you may not agree with what he likes to do with the budget, but he understand. so there is still a place for him there. he
. the euphoria of re-election is quickly giving way to hard reality of governing with the foreign policy crisis bubbling from iran to syria. plus, lingering questions about the terror attack in benghazi, which will result in those three different house and senate committees, grilling administration officials next thursday. >> hopefully now that we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did notch they claim to be the most pope and transparent administration ever but they are not going the basics in sharing with congress this basic information. >> one of the three panels the house foreign affairs committee invited secretary of state hillary clinton to testify about the terror attack for the first time. >> we are very committed to working with the congress throughout the process. >> on the domestic front second term issues are as thorny, with the president pushing for bipartisan deal on immigration reform and that eluded several predecessors. his campaign manager conducted the time conference call of the election season today and did a victo
efficiently. you may not agree with all the decisions. they've had foreign policy and intelligence setbacks, but if you look at as the president ran on, winding down the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan on a different timetable, dealing with the pursuit of the war on terror in an aggressive manner, general petraeus has been a huge part of that, secretary clinton and secretary panetta follows secretary gates. foreign policy is a huge part of the next four years for this president. he needs a team of heavyweights as he's had in general petraeus. whatever you think of how he handled benghazi, he's a heavyweight without a doubt in terms of national security experience, intelligence experience and his direction at the cia. >> can we widen the lens and talk about petraeus's career and rye mind people this person has been considered an american hero, a war hero. we just talked about a moment ago flirting with getting into the presidential race, and that would have been frightening for either side. this is an american hero. can you just remind people of some of those details before
in the christian conservative community. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election survey that we commissioned, that we got this morning about 5:00 a.m., but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i have seen throughout my career. there is a tendency to caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and suggest that they live in trailer parks and are poor and uneducated and easy to command. they cling to their guns and religion and vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs to the exact same percentage the rest of the electorate. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the just and unjust alike. they are also struggling with their mortgages and figuring out how to put their kids through school. they voted to a large part on the economy and jobs. you look at issues like same-sex marriage and abortion, and it was about 10% of what drove. i think what you
over among foreign policy experts? >> well, i think-- i mean, it's-- i think you have john kerry, or you have susan rice. and i think either one of them could be nominated and probably the foreign policy establishment would say that's fine. john kerry probably has more, but susan rice has served as u.n. ambassador and she's got know a lot of foreign experience, certain, from that experience. she's been at the state department bore, too. i mean, her history is in foreign policy. she hasn't opinion secretary of state. he hasn't been on the hill in the capacity john kerry is, but she certainly is experienced. >> reporter: the aforementioned general petraeus, a story that continues to rock this town. the president talked about it at the press conference, said it was a sad personal saga. actually said very nice things about david petraeus' contributions to his country, and also said-- i'm not sure the exact word he used-- but basically no top vent intelligen was revealed. >> i think he made a point of saying so far. and so far, there is not any negative effect on national security. bu
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shifted emphasis of u.s. policy to the asia-pacific. that reduced the significance of europe's importance. do you think we will see the same? >> absolutely. given the inward looking mode of u.s. society, given the financial constraints of the u.s., there is no alternative. the crucial question is -- will the europeans deliver? can they deliver in terms of financial contributions to international crisis managemen
foreign policy, and they wouldn't have any trouble getting confirmed. >> jennifer: yeah, for sure. jeanine thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room" up next new hampshire's maggie hassan is the only democrat governor sitting there. she is next right here in "the war room." ♪ sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. [ male announcer ] hurry in to red lobster's crabfest! the only time of year you can savor 5 succulent crab entrees all under 20 dollars. like a half-pound of tender snow crab paired with savory grilled shrimp, just 12.99. or our hearty crab and roasted garlic seafood bake. [ forsythe ] if i wouldn't put it on my table at home, i wouldn't bring it in. my name's jon forsythe and i sea food differently. (vo) cenk uygur is many things. >>oh really? >>"if you ever raise taxes on >>the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! >> together, we will build a stronger, more innovative new hampshire. now we have got a lot of work ahead of us to make progress for our state. it will take all of us coming together, all
of the foreign policy and defense positions, huge turnover in these critical posts, some of the names being floated as permanent replacement are john brenen undersecretary of defense, the director for national intelligence. for the cia, is it important to get this one picked and in place quickly? >> yeah, absolutely. you want to move on from this. the cia will function a very capable organization but you need someone at the-ment leading the direction. he had to be traveling and doing all of these things. i think john brenen would be a good choice. he has been doing a lot of quiet diplomacy abroad especially in the middle east but right now you have the situation with hilary clinton may be leaving, leon pen d -- penetta. >> jennifer: do you think senate confirmation for any of these will be very difficult? don't you think that there is some recognition that these positions are going to [ inaudible ] confirmation. >> it's true and if colon powell and john kerry, i'm just throwing them out there -- it's two very capable people leading foreign policy and they wouldn't have a
it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into this party at this point. >> he can become a cable tv host. >> who knows. >> with one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today -- >> he's gone, he's over, history. it w it sounded like a valedictory. he didn't talk about our cause will live, we're going to continue to fight in the future. it was sort of like he was going to recede, he had done it twice, he lost. there are a lot of people who regarded him as the transitional figurine when he was the nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bain capital, who knows. i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? he's long been considered one of the rising stars of the republican congress. will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him try to broaden out, claim the mantle of the party standard bearer? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a hou
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 383 (some duplicates have been removed)

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